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The Opening Souvenir Brochure for the New Theatre, Oxford on the 26th of February 1934

Oxford Theatres

The Opening Souvenir Brochure for the New Theatre, Oxford on the 26th of February 1934

Souvenir of re-opening on February 26th, 1934 after complete re-building.

Board of Directors:

ANDREW WALSH (Chairman)
FRED. H. BALLARD
STANLEY C. DORRILL (Managing Director)
FRANK GRAY
H. S. KINGERLEE
CECIL F. LUCAS

Prologue

THERE has been nothing half-hearted about the reconstruction of Oxford's Theatre. When the realization that the old building was inadequate for the current needs of its patrons was reached, the Directorate, not only determined that the new building should be modern in its equipment, but they also decided to incorporate certain important innovations which, although proven in principle, had never actually been operated commercially for the benefit of theatre goers as a matter of routine.

To-day, therefore, the New Theatre, Oxford, stands not merely in line with but ahead of its contemporaries; an edifice that can proudly compare with the most modern theatres in the world.

Precisely what ingenious, comprehensive and attractive arrangements have been made for the comfort of its patrons, and for their delectation by the finest possible presentation of talent, is briefly outlined in the following pages.

The New Theatre, Oxford

THE MIRACLE IN OUR MIDST

A sketch of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.IT was on the evening of February 25th, 1933, that the New Theatre, Oxford, closed its doors to the public. Almost immediately demolition of the building was put in hand. During the twelve months that have intervened something more than a new building has been erected on the site. A complete metamorphosis, not merely of a building nor even of a street but almost of a locality, has taken place, for the new structure that has been reared on the old site embraces land on which other property stood, and it has given quite a new appearance to this section of the City of Oxford.

The site occupied by the new building has been the location of the theatre since 1886. As a matter of historical interest the original building was the scene of a fire in 1892, when considerable damage was done to the auditorium, but little hurt came to the stage.

Right - A sketch of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Further alterations were also effected to the auditorium in 1908, when the theatre was closed down from June to October.

The recent reconstruction, however, has been far more thorough than either of its predecessors, and from water tower to cellar the present building is completely new.

That so much has been accomplished in twelve months is indeed a tribute to those who have had a hand in the enterprise, and a realization of the number of interlocking and dovetailing operations that have had to be carried out proves that a very fine degree of organization and management has been operative.

This will be better appreciated after a perusal of the following all too brief description.

A photograph of the 1886 'New Theatre' Oxford during the run of 'Two Roses' - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Above - A photograph of the 1886 'New Theatre' Oxford during the run of 'Two Roses' - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. Caption reads:- 'The New Theatre, Oxford, photographed during the visit of Ben Greet's Company in May, 1888. Note the steps on the left which are said to have led to the old Ice House'.

GENERAL LAYOUT

A sketch of the 'Main Feature Window' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.The main axis of the theatre runs parallel to George Street, the stage being at the end nearer to Gloucester Green. The visitor on approaching George Street from the direction of Cornmarket Street is immediately impressed by the high, imposing facade frontage of Bath stone and red brick. At night a brilliant 'neon' sign high up, together with subdued flood lighting, adds to the bright effect, and a lighted canopy overhanging the pavement protects patrons in inclement weather.

Right - A sketch of the 'Main Feature Window' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

On entering the building one passes a battery of box office apertures, and enters immediately into a long, beautifully furnished foyer, which runs right across the building. From this foyer with its numerous cloakrooms, entrances lead to the various parts of the theatre — three downward stairways to the stalls, and one grand central staircase, which divides after one flight to the right and to the left, leading to the centre of the grand circle.

There are three sets of seats — the stalls, circle, and balcony. There is seating accommodation for 2000 (as compared with 1000 in the old theatre) and every chair is of the latest type with ample knee room, shaped and sprung to provide the maximum comfort.

Immediately above the main foyer there is a lounge, and at the back of the circle again, a very tastefully decorated bar, which serves both circle and balcony.

The main stalls bar is reached from the back of the stalls themselves, down a short flight of stairs which leads to a spacious lounge, a triumph of decorative art.

The bar itself is down a further short flight, and the highly delightful scheme of lighting and decor of the upholstery in this part of the building are such that its attractiveness is immediately ensured.

AUDITORIUM

A sketch of the auditorium of the 1886 'New Theatre' Oxford - From the 'New Theatre's' opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Above - A sketch of the auditorium of the 1886 'New Theatre' Oxford - From the 'New Theatre's' opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. - Caption reads:- 'Interior of the New Theatre, Oxford, opened in February, 1886, partially destroyed by fire March 11th, 1892. The old print reproduced above represents the Re-opening Performance (Messrs. Carpenter's 'Middleman' Company).

A sketch of the 'Proscenium' and auditorium of the 1934 'New Theatre, Oxford' - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Above - A sketch of the 'Proscenium' and auditorium of the 1934 'New Theatre, Oxford' - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

A sketch of the 'Main Foyer' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.The old Oxford Theatre had a stage front of 22 ft. 6 ins. The width of the new stage is exactly double; that is, 45 ft.

Right - A sketch of the 'Main Foyer' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The general tone of the decorative scheme of the interior is a rich sunset red, relieved by some extremely tasteful plaster moulding in harmonious design round the proscenium arch, and particular attention has been paid to the lighting effects. To render the building acoustically perfect the roof has been left free of ornament and it stretches high above one's head in a gigantic sweep that gives a very impressive effect.

A sketch of the 'Stalls Lounge' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.The lighting of the auditorium is particularly imposing. All round the proscenium arch — that is to say, right up each side of the stage and across its top — there are concealed lights which flood the whole of the sides and dome of the building.

Left - A sketch of the 'Stalls Lounge' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

These are co-ordinated with other concealed flood banks high up each side at the back of the theatre, and all these lights are controllable from a master dimmer switch. Thus any combination of lighting effect can be obtained — not merely on the stage, but actually in the auditorium itself — so that the mood of the audience can be swayed precisely to the tenor of the particular style of presentation, be it drama or comedy, that is being given at the time.

A sketch of the 'Grand Circle Lounge' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.An interesting feature in connection with the chair upholstery is, that instead of being universally coloured, the chairs alternate in threes of different coloured upholstery of matching shades, so that instead of the usual sombre effect being produced a sense of brightness and cheerfulness is achieved.

Right - A sketch of the 'Grand Circle Lounge' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

In addition to the main bars at the back of the stalls and circle there are also smaller cleverly located bars at the right hand side of the theatre. The decoration of these is, perhaps, of a more intimate character than that of the others, and one senses that these smaller bars will become very popular.

Incidentally, it may be mentioned for the benefit of the motorist, that there is an exit with a large crush-hall leading out on to the Gloucester Green car park side of the building so that access to cars can be obtained with the maximum ease.

SCHEME OF DECORATIONS

A sketch of the 'Upper Circle Bar' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.In general, the decoration of the foyers, lounges and bars has been designed to serve as a foil in contrast with the general decoration of the auditorium. For instance, the intimate bar at the front of the theatre for the stalls is decorated in low tone pink and pale green, and the corresponding circle bar is in warm beige and orange.

Left - A sketch of the 'Upper Circle Bar' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The main theme of the colouring of the auditorium is a play upon reds, and includes pale pink, deep vermilion, orange, gold, mole and grey — a scheme which spreads from the walls to the seats and carpets; while the great tableau curtains, 45 ft. wide, are in simple gold velvet, slightly relieved by red in the pelmet. This colour scheme, subject to the play of the varying flood lights, produces an atmosphere of warm leisurely comfort, inviting the audience to enjoy every feeling of well-being.

The inspiration for the scheme and ornamentation around the proscenium arch has been based on the notes of twelfth-century music, and the great latticed circles over the centre serve both as ornaments and as ventilators.

VENTILATION

A sketch of the 'Stalls Bar' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.All that is latest in the science of ventilation of public buildings has been incorporated in this Theatre. There are two distinct systems — central heating by hot water pipes and radiators, and also complete control of the atmosphere both for temperature and humidity by means of conditioned air.

Right - A sketch of the 'Stalls Bar' of the New Theatre, Oxford - From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The central heating is provided by two thermostatically controlled oil fired boilers situated in the basement, and the air conditioning plant completely changes the whole of the air in the building every quarter of an hour. Fresh air is drawn in, is washed free from impurities with falling sprays of water, is heated or cooled as climatic conditions demand, and is then circulated through cunningly placed draughtless ducts in the auditorium. Generally speaking, the temperature of the auditorium is controlled by the air conditioning plant. The dressing rooms, corridors, lounges and foyers are maintained at equable temperatures by means of central heating. In short, nothing that could add to the comfort of the patrons has been omitted.

SAFETY

A Playbill for Mrs Faucit appearing in 'The Wonder! A Woman Keeps Her Secret' and 'The Shepherd or Wolf Robber' and 'Of Age To-Morrow' at the first Oxford Theatre - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. It needs but a casual glance around the interior of the building to realize that all gangways, doorways, corridors and other passages that will be used by the audience are of ample dimensions, and even a full house of 2000 people could rapidly leave the building without any confusion.

Right - A Playbill for Mrs Faucit appearing in 'The Wonder! A Woman Keeps Her Secret' and 'The Shepherd or Wolf Robber' and 'Of Age To-Morrow' at the first Oxford Theatre - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The safety devices incorporated in the stage itself, are in addition extremely interesting. Primarily, the stage and the huge space above it into which all the scenery is 'flown' (and which space, incidentally, is far higher than the roof of the auditorium) is, in a sense, a chimney capable of being separated from all the other parts of the building, such as the auditorium, artistes' dressing rooms, etc. Right across the 45 ft. opening of the stage there is a counter-weighted safety curtain, the huge bulk of which can be lowered (it is controlled hydraulically) in the short space of twenty-five seconds. Practically speaking, this hermetically seals the whole of the stage area, and right on top of the roof, high up over the stage, there is a huge ventilator, the object of which in case of emergency would be to concentrate any conflagration into this part of the building where it would be least likely to affect human life. From a safety point of view nothing has been left undone.

THE STAGE

Let us now leave the auditorium and go, in imagination, into those parts of the theatre which it is extremely unlikely that most members of the audience will see.

In accordance with modern principles of design, the stage, instead of sloping down to the auditorium, is flat, the rake of the seating arrangements in the auditorium itself ensuring perfect clarity of view of the whole of the stage from every seat. Perhaps the main feature of the stage is the great revolving section, 35 ft. in diameter. Outside London this is the largest revolving stage in England, and it is so delicately balanced that even with a heavy scene on one sector and a comparatively light scene on another it is very easily moved round so that little or no time is lost between the presentation of scenes to the audience.

An advertisement for the 'Alliance Assurance Company Ltd' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. High up above the stage there is what is known as a grid, this consisting of a series of slats with their appropriate pulleys through which work the battens whereon the various sections of the scenery are attached so that they can be `flown'; that is, hoisted right up above the stage out of sight of the audience. There are sixty-three sets of lines in the grid. This, in non-theatrical language, means that sixty-three different pieces of scenery can be raised or lowered during the course of a play.

Left - An advertisement for the 'Alliance Assurance Company Ltd' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Labour has been reduced and time saved by a system of counter-weighting. Each piece of scenery is carefully balanced against weights so that one man single handed can raise it or lower it.

Although the stage opening of 45 ft. seems large, there is almost as much of the stage out of sight as there is within the view of the audience.

An advertisement for the 'Berkeley Electrical Engineers Company' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. The total expanse is no less than 85 ft. from wall to wall, and 43 ft. from footlights to back wall. This back wall, incidentally, incorporates certain special features introduced by Mr. Stanley Dorrill, the Manager of the Theatre, for newly developed technique in lighting effects, which promise to be extremely interesting and attractive.

Right - An advertisement for the 'Berkeley Electrical Engineers Company' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

At the back of the stage there is a corridor running the whole of its width so that artistes need never have to walk across the stage itself. In fact, every known modern convenience and many ideas that have been suggested by the latest practice have been incorporated in the construction of the stage, so that for rapidity of operation and breadth of effect there exists no finer theatre in the world. This may sound a very ambitious statement, but we are content to leave results to prove it.

THE ELECTRICAL SYSTEM

An advertisement for the 'T. H. Kingerlee & Sons' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. The electrical supply for the theatre is drawn from the mains of the Corporation of Oxford Electricity Department, and some idea of the amount of current used can be judged from the fact that the maximum demand on the electricity plant of one of the larger musical plays to be presented is expected to be about 180 kilowatts. Perhaps an even more impressive way of stating the same thing is to say that the energy represented by 225 h.p. will be expended in the form of light.

An advertisement for the 'Thos. De La Rue & Co., Ltd Ash Trays' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. The total length of cables used throughout the building is between fifteen and twenty miles, and there are 2600 lamps installed.

Left - An advertisement for the 'T. H. Kingerlee & Sons' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The lighting in the auditorium has already been described, with the exception of a secondary or safety lighting system which automatically comes into operation should for any reason a failure of the main supply take place. These safety lights are fed from a storage battery which is maintained fully charged on the premises.

Right - An advertisement for the 'Thos. De La Rue & Co., Ltd Ash Trays' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The whole of the decorative lighting is controlled either from the stage or from the cinema projection room which is located right up in the roof of the building.

STAGE LIGHTING

A photograph of the 'Stage Swicthboard and Dimmer Regulator' of the 1934 'New Theatre, Oxford' 'made to the special design of the Consulting Engineers' From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.The stage lighting is planned in accordance with the latest practice, and having regard to the varied character of the work it has to do. For the main acting area there are the usual footlights and five overhead battens or banks. From each side of the cinema projection room two high powered spot arcs (100 amps each) project downwards on to the stage, and in the front of the balcony eight 1000 watt focus lamps can flood direct on to the front of the stage. The switchboard for controlling this complicated lighting system is placed at the side of the stage, and it looks rather like a control bridge of some ocean-going liner. There are upwards of sixty-six circuits on the board, and the flexibility of the system is such that precise control can be obtained for any lighting effect that is known to modern technique.

Right - A photograph of the 'Stage Swicthboard and Dimmer Regulator' of the 1934 'New Theatre, Oxford' 'made to the special design of the Consulting Engineers' From the Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Although intended primarily for stage production the theatre is equipped with a roomy projection box and is wired for sound' so that cinema films can be used either separately or in conjunction with the ordinary stage effects.

An advertisement for the 'Standard Telephones and Cables Limited' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Above - An advertisement for the 'Standard Telephones and Cables Limited' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

ACCOMMODATION FOR ARTISTES

An advertisement for the 'Ajax Safety Curtains by John Mallin & Co., Ltd' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.No less impressive than the spaciousness and comfort provided for the audience is the accommodation at the back of the stage for the visiting artistes. Whereas the old theatre could accommodate approximately a cast of sixty, the new building has dressing accommodation for 120, and this dressing accommodation has been viewed by experts and judged as the best of its kind in the country to-day. There are four 'Star' rooms, one with a special retiring room, and the chorus rooms all have separate chairs, mirrors, etc. There is a passenger lift to enable the cast to get from the stage to the dressing rooms and vice versa with the utmost rapidity, and nothing has been left undone to ensure the comfort and convenience of the performers, which in turn means that they can give of their best.

Right - An advertisement for the 'Ajax Safety Curtains by John Mallin & Co., Ltd' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

SI MONUMENTUM QUAERIS CIRCUMSPIC

An advertisement for the 'Pixtons Theatre Furnishers' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.In brief, nothing that could usefully be added to the equipment of the theatre has been omitted from the specification. Catering as it does for a public that must be unique for the variety of its tastes, it is capable of accommodating the presentation of any type of production that can successfully be shown anywhere else in the country. That it is destined to add still more to the fame of the City of Oxford there need never be any doubt, and it stands to-day as a monument to the foresight and business acumen of those who have been responsible for its construction.

Left - An advertisement for the 'Pixtons Theatre Furnishers' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Those who have Made this Building

`Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new:
That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do.'
Locksley Hall — TENNYSON

An advertisement for the 'Beckwin Theatre Furnishers' and 'Garton & Thorne Ornamental Metal Work' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.NO description of the New Theatre building would be complete without there being placed on record the names of those firms concerned in its achievement. To them, working faithfully and in harmonious co-operation with each other, goes the credit for the gradual development, brick upon brick, and girder on girder, of this new landmark in Oxford.

Right - An advertisement for the 'Beckwin Theatre Furnishers' and 'Garton & Thorne Ornamental Metal Work' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The Theatre has been designed and erected under the supervision of Wm. & T. R. Milburn, F.R.I.B.A., Sunderland; the Decorations and internal fittings designed by T. P. Bennett & Son, F.R.I.B.A., London; Consulting Engineer for Steelwork, S. G. Newstead, Victoria Street, London; Consulting Engineers for Electric Light Installation, Ridge & Aldred, Southampton Row, London; Consulting Engineer for heating and ventilating, N. Vaux, Sunderland; Clerk of Works, J. F. Crisp.

For the actual building itself T. H. Kingerlee & Sons Ltd., Builders, Oxford, are responsible, and the binding material that holds the whole structure together was supplied by the Oxford and Shipton Cement Ltd., Kidlington, Oxon.

The skeleton of the structure — whence comes its backbone of strength and longevity — its steel girders, was supplied by A. D. Dawnay & Sons Ltd., Steelworks Road, Battersea. The roof was slated by Wormells, Regent Street, Coventry, and the stone that gives its imposing appearance was supplied by the Yockney & Hartham Park Stone Co. Ltd., Corsham, Wilts, and Geo. Vint & Bros., Idle, Bradford, Yorks. The whole of the casements, steel windows and cast-iron work for the windows was carried out by Crittalls of Braintree.

An advertisement for the 'Constone Ltd' and 'Gimson & Co' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.Pre-cast floors were supplied by Constone Ltd., 12 Peacock Lane, Leicester, and the decorative floors by Korkoid Decorative Floors, London and Glasgow; the entrance pavement and wall work being done by John Stubbs & Sons, of Liverpool. Korkoid Decorative Floors were also responsible for the attractive flooring of the bars.

The artificial stone steps that are a distinctive feature of the construction were supplied by Malcolm Macleod & Co. Ltd., Glen Road, Waltham-stow, London, E.17, and notable for a very large amount of the visual effects is the fibrous plasterwork and decoration in the auditorium carried out by F. Dejong & Co. Ltd., 84 Albert Street, Camden Town, N.W.1 .

Left - An advertisement for the 'Constone Ltd' and 'Gimson & Co' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Ornamental bronze, chromium-plated and iron metal work was provided by Garton & Thorne, Camden Town, London, The iron handrails and fireproof doors are the work of J. H. Grant Ltd. Oxford.

An advertisement for the 'Oxford Cement' and 'Firth's Carpets' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.Turning now to the equipment; the huge revolving stage was installed by Lift and Engineering Ltd., 622 Wandsworth Road, London, and the enormous fireproof curtain, 47 ft. across, was constructed by John Mallin & Co. Ltd., West Bromwich. The precise way in which this huge unit operates is a pleasure to behold.

Right - An advertisement for the 'Oxford Cement' and 'Firth's Carpets' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

An advertisement for the 'Strand Electric' and 'Vint & Bros Yorkshire Stone' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. Rapidity in scene change has been ensured by the installation of counterweight gear by Gimson & Co. Ltd., Vulcan Road, Leicester, while all the stage decking has been done by John E. Pinder, 80 Regent Street, London, who is also responsible for the bioscope shutters in the projector room.

Left - An advertisement for the 'Strand Electric' and 'Vint & Bros Yorkshire Stone' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

There is an enormous amount of electrical work in the theatre, and it was entrusted to the Berkeley Electrical Engineering Co., Vincent Square, London; the Strand Electric and Engineering Co. Ltd., of 24 Floral Street, Covent Garden, London, W.C.2, being responsible for the stage switch board, a very important part of the equipment; while the rectifier for altering the nature of the supplied current to suit varying needs is by the Hewittic Electric Co. Ltd., Hersham, Walton-on-Thames.

The whole of the electrical intake gear has been put in by Wm. Sanders & Co., Wednesbury, and the arc lamps that flood the stage with their brilliant light were made by the Major Equipment Co. Ltd., 162 Millbank, London, S.W.I.

Advertisements for  'Dawnay Steelwork' and 'Pickerings Lifts - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. Advertisements for  'Rowells Plumbing' and 'F. De Jong Plasterwork & Decoration' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

 

Above - Advertisements for 'Dawnay Steelwork', 'Pickerings Lifts, 'Rowells Plumbing', and 'F. De Jong Plasterwork & Decoration' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

An advertisement for the 'Major Equipment Co., Ltd Arc Projectors & Spotlights' and 'Docker Brothers Paint Services' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. The Haystack Lantern was supplied by Mellowes & Co. Ltd., of Sheffield, specialists in this type of work.

Turning now to the decorative side, the carpet manufacturers are T. F. Firth & Sons Ltd., Brighouse, and all carpets and draperies have been supplied through Pixtons Ltd., 65 Newman Street, London. The very important work of arranging the seating, 'Star' dressing rooms, and cloak room furnishings, has been undertaken with conspicuous success by Beck & Windibank Ltd., Birmingham. Paint and distemper has been supplied by Docker Bros., Lady-wood, Birmingham, and the walnut doors that add to the decorative theme by S. Elliott & Sons Ltd., Caversham, Reading.

Right - An advertisement for the 'Major Equipment Co., Ltd Arc Projectors & Spotlights' and 'Docker Brothers Paint Services' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Ash trays; these humble but important adjuncts have been supplied by Thomas de la Rue & Co. Ltd., Shern-Hall Street, Walthamstow, London, E.17, whilst the Vacuum Cleaning Plant has been installed by the Sturtevant Engineering Co. Ltd. London. Glass and china are by Lawleys of Regent Street.

The heating of the building for the comfort of the patrons has been the responsibility of Combustions Ltd., 37 Walbrook, London, E.C.4, whose oil burners fire the boilers.

The plumbing was entrusted to Rowells Ltd., Byron Street, Newcastle-onTyne, while gutters and down pipes were in the hands of H. S. & C. Kingerlee Ltd., Oxford.

Advertisements for 'Kinnear Shutters', 'Wormells Roofing', and 'John E Pinder Stage & Cinema Contractor and Engineer' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Above - Advertisements for 'Kinnear Shutters', 'Wormells Roofing', and 'John E Pinder Stage & Cinema Contractor and Engineer' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Advertisements for 'Malcolm Macleod Pre-Cast Reinforced Concrete Staircases', 'Korkoid Flooing', 'The Expanded Metal Co., Ltd', 'John Strubbs & Sons', Lawleys', Mellowes', and 'Sanders Switchgear- From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. Advertisements for 'Malcolm Macleod Pre-Cast Reinforced Concrete Staircases', 'Korkoid Flooing', 'The Expanded Metal Co., Ltd', 'John Strubbs & Sons', Lawleys', Mellowes', and 'Sanders Switchgear- From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

 

Above - Advertisements for 'Malcolm Macleod Pre-Cast Reinforced Concrete Staircases', 'Korkoid Flooing', 'The Expanded Metal Co., Ltd', 'John Strubbs & Sons', Lawleys', Mellowes', and 'Sanders Switchgear- From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

An advertisement for the 'Combustions Ltd Automatic Heating System' and 'J. H. Grant Ltd Ironworks' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. There is a considerable amount of metal lathing in the construction of the building, and this has been supplied by the Expanded Metal Co. Ltd., Westminster.

We must not forget, either, the lifts — both a service lift and a passenger lift for the artistes back stage — which have been installed by Pickerings Ltd., Stockton-on-Tees.

The big rolling shutters, through which all the scenery is passed in from outside, have been supplied and erected by A. L. Gibson & Co. Ltd., Twickenham, and in no sense the least important commercial undertaking is the insurance, which has been effected through the Alliance Assurance Co. Ltd., Oxford.

Left - An advertisement for the 'Combustions Ltd Automatic Heating System' and 'J. H. Grant Ltd Ironworks' - From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Advertisements for 'Bath Stone, 'Lift & Engineering Co., Ltd', 'Elliot Reading Mahogany, Teak and Walnut', and 'Sturevant Cleaning Materials'- From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934. The telephones which form such a vital part of the internal organization have been installed by the Standard Telephone Co. Ltd., Aldwych, London.

Right - Advertisements for 'Bath Stone, 'Lift & Engineering Co., Ltd', 'Elliot Reading Mahogany, Teak and Walnut', and 'Sturevant Cleaning Materials'- From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

The text on this page and its accompanying images are from the New Theatre, Oxford opening souvenir brochure of February 1934. The Brochure, text and images should not be further reproduced anywhere, including online, without permission from me personally. Details of how to go about this can be found on the Contact Page.

The Back page of the brochure carrying Advertisements for 'Crittall Windows', Hewittic Rectifiers', and 'The Oxford Monthly Magazine'- From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

Above - The Back Page of the Brochure carrying Advertisements for 'Crittall Windows', Hewittic Rectifiers', and 'The Oxford Monthly Magazine'- From the New Theatre's opening souvenir brochure in February 1934.

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