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The Victoria Music Hall, 625 Argyle Street, Anderston Cross, Glasgow

Later - The Tivoli Variety Theatre / The Gaiety Theatre / The Glasgow Concert Hall

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The (Royal) Victoria, seating some 3,000, had opened by December 1873 as a variety hall, and that month staged a pantomime, Aladdin. Lessees came and went, including Sutherland & Miller of the Royal Albert Music Hall, Bridgeton who signed a ten-year lease in December 1879, but did not stay the course.

It functioned in the late 1880s under George Testo followed by T. L. McLymont (who ran two music halls), and others thereafter - “The Scenes have been Painted by the eminent Artist, Mr Glover, late of the Theatre Royal”. In the 1890s the Victoria closed as a music hall and passed into the hands of the Salvation Army, with the flies and drop scene continuing in place.

Thumbnail of a Tivoli Theatre programme held at the excellent 'Glasgow Story' Website. To see the programme and read information about it click here.During 1898 it was taken over and refurbished by Bernard Armstrong and Thomas Colquhoun, opening on 2nd January 1899 as the Tivoli Variety Theatre. Colquhoun was a grandson of James and Christina Baylis, creators of the Theatre Royal, Hope Street, and of the Scotia/ MetropoleTheatre, Stockwell Street. It presented musicals, variety shows and pantomimes often with artistes who had appeared at the Metropole.

Right - A thumbnail of a Tivoli Theatre programme held at the excellent 'Glasgow Story' Website. To see the programme and read information about it click here.

Thumbnail of a Gaiety Theatre programme held at the excellent 'Glasgow Story' Website. To see the programme and read information about it click here.W. F. Frame helped the new partnership and in 1904 the Tivoli was substantially rebuilt, changing its name to the Glasgow Gaiety. The reopening gala was attended by Lord Provost Sir John Ure-Primrose and city magistrates. This Gaiety Theatre should not be confused with the Gaiety Theatre in Sauchiehall Street.

Left - A thumbnail of a Gaiety Theatre programme held at the excellent 'Glasgow Story' Website. To see the programme and read information about it click here.

In 1909 it became a cine-variety house and after remodeling in 1935 a full time cinema.

By 1960 the cinema had closed but after the disastrous fire which destroyed the city`s St Andrews Halls, the Corporation of Glasgow took it over and adapted it as a temporary replacement for concerts, known as Glasgow Concert Hall, until its final closure in 1968.

The above text was written and kindly sent in for inclusion on the site by Graeme Smith in February 2014.