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Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump'

To see more Arthur Lloyd Song Sheets Click here...

Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump'

 

Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump'

 

Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump'

 

Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump'

 

Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump'

 

Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump'

Above - Athur Lloyd's 'Aldgate pump' - Courtesy Max Tyler of the BMHS

To see more Arthur Lloyd Song Sheets Click here...

 

The Musical Times - August 1st 1869

The following is an extract from an article in the Musical Times of 1869 entitled 'A Comic Concert' written by Henry C. Lunn, in which he writes, rather disparigingly, on the Music Hall artistes of the day, including seeing Arthur Lloyd perform 'Aldgate Pump' at the St. James's Hall.

The next singer, Mr. Arthur Lloyd, is somewhat superior to the rest, both in his method of delivering, the words of his songs, and his musical acquirements; and if he had been supplied with good material, no doubt he would have made the best of it. Unfortunately, however, the compositions he gave were quite on a level with the rest. We have no doubt that Mr. Lloyd will agree with us that there is nothing exquisitely comic in meeting a girl "near Aldgate pump;" but then he strictly believes, from a long course of music-hall training, that the oftener you repeat these words, the more the fun heightens.

Indeed, we may say that these songs are so completely cut to a pattern that, with the exception of the heroine sometimes living at a "pie-shop," and sometimes at other establishments frequented by their devoted admirers, you can scarcely tell, one from another. The excessive attraction of the lady who serves over some counter is too much for the vocalist who relates the tale; he declares his love, is favorably received, pays for everything liberally during his courtship, is astonished at finding her with a rival (who, by the way, is always "tall"), upbraids her with her perfidy, is laughed at, and eventually; retires from the field, with his heart full and his pockets empty, to relate his misfortunes in music.

After Mr. Lloyd had, with Christian forbearance, in spite of the ill usage he had received, declared that he should always think of the girl he met "Near Aldgate pump" he gave a short assumption off a "nigger," and retired amidst the usual applause.

The Musical Times - August 1st 1869 - Courtesy John Grice.

To see the complete article Click here.