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The New Theatre, Kingston Square, Hull

Formerly - The Assembly Rooms

Hull Theatres Index

 A Google Streetview image of the New Theatre, Hull - Click to Interact

Above - A Google Streetview image of the New Theatre, Hull - Click to Interact

 

Late 1940s Programme for 'Message for Margaret' at the New Theatre, Hull - Click to see Entire Programme.The New Theatre which stands on Kingston Square, Hull today opened on the 16th of October 1939 with the Hull Repertory Company production of 'Me and My Girl'. The Theatre was a reconstruction of the former Assembly Rooms which had first been built by R. H. Sharp over 100 years earlier in 1834. The New Theatre was built as the new home for the Hull Repertory Company who had previously been using the Little Theatre next door since 1924.

In 1939 the Company's then Director Peppino Santangelo, who had turned the Organisation's fortunes around since taking the reigns, set about the reconstruction of the former Assembly Rooms into the New Theatre which involved it being gutted internally and then converted into a Theatre by W. B. Wheatley and the well known Theatre Architect Robert Cromie.

Right - A Late 1940s Programme for 'Message for Margaret' at the New Theatre, Hull - Click to see the Entire Programme. And some interesting information from the programme can be found below.

The Theatre originally had one balcony and a box either side but the balcony was far from the stage and the auditorium was considered to be unnaturally wide.

 

The auditorium of the New Theatre, Hull - Courtesy Calvin Parker

Above - The auditorium of the New Theatre, Hull today - Courtesy Calvin Parker

A photograph of the auditorium of New Theatre, Hull during the get in for 'The Full Monty' in April 2009 - Courtesy Marcus Heald

Above - A photograph of the auditorium of New Theatre, Hull during the get in for 'The Full Monty' in April 2009 - Courtesy Marcus Heald

The New Theatre, Hull in the 1960s - From a programme for the New Theatre - Courtesy Marcus HealdIn the late 1960s the Theatre's stage was deepened and the orchestra pit enlarged, whilst at the same time the auditorium was improved with new seating.

Right - The New Theatre, Hull in the 1960s - From a programme for the New Theatre - Courtesy Marcus Heald

In the 1980s the original entrance and portico of the Theatre were glazed in so that the FOH areas could be enlarged and enhanced.

The Theatre is today a Grade II Listed Building and has a capacity of 1,189.

You may like to visit the Theatre's own Website here.

There is more information and some relevant images for the New Theatre below.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

 

A selection of programmes for the Hull Little and New Theatres - Courtesy Dave Wilson.

Above - A selection of programmes for the Hull Little and New Theatres - Courtesy Dave Wilson.

 

A photograph of the stage of New Theatre, Hull during production for 'The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas', an amateur show with Vicki Michelle (Yvette from Allo Allo) taking the lead, in the Theatre's 70th Anniversary week of the 12th of October 2009 - Courtesy Marcus Heald

Above - A photograph of the stage of New Theatre, Hull during production for 'The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas', an amateur show with Vicki Michelle (Yvette from Allo Allo) taking the lead, in the Theatre's 70th Anniversary week of the 12th of October 2009 - Courtesy Marcus Heald

The Roof Void above the auditorium of the New Theatre, Hull - Courtesy Calvin Parker

Above - The Roof Void above the auditorium of the New Theatre, Hull - Courtesy Calvin Parker

 

EDITORIAL BY PEPPINO SANTANGELO

BY ORDER OF THE GOVERNMENT - (NON-POLITICAL)

An article from the 'Message for Margaret' programme shown top of page

The New Theatre, Hull in 2009 - From a programme for the New Theatre - Courtesy Marcus Heald

Above - The New Theatre, Hull in 2009 - From a programme for the New Theatre - Courtesy Marcus Heald

 Commemorative Lapel Pin to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the New Theatre, Hull in 1989.We endeavour-nay, it is our policy-in the Theatre, to be nonpolitical in outlook because we realise that most, if not all, of our patrons have a political consciousness of their own and if any one of these differ materially, or idealistically, from ours we might, instead of reconciling the conflict of opinion, succeed in alienating from ourselves the support which would be ours, if our respective outlook was identical or, at least, non-partisan, and so far as the Theatre is concerned, survival is more important than the possession of an exclusive political doctrine.

Right - Commemorative Lapel Pin to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the New Theatre, Hull in 1989.

Our first hypothesis is that the Theatre has no politics and, therefore, is non-political. The fact that it comprises many individuals who each possess deep rooted political convictions does not invalidate the general truth of the thesis because these convictions are subjugated for a period of time-the period and time of daily employment-to a greater common interest-the interest of living which is the determining factor in formulating any policy, not least, a theatrical policy.

Programme for 'Robinson Crusoe' at the New Theatre, Hull in December 1966 - Courtesy Tom O'Connor.Our second hypothesis is that, collectively, an audience has no politics and, therefore, is non-political. Here again, the fact that the individuals that comprise an audience each have a political conviction of their own precludes the possibility of an audience-unless it be a highly specialised group of people-having identical political opinions. If the political expressions of an audience are heterogeneous in character-like the actors on the stage all speaking together and in different languages-then it cannot be said to speak as one voice politically and, therefore, because it has no specific political conscience, collectively, an audience can be said to have no politics.

Left - A Programme for 'Robinson Crusoe' at the New Theatre, Hull in December 1966 - Courtesy Tom O'Connor.

If these two hypotheses are correct, then it is equally correct to assume in theory, if not in fact, that neither-the Theatre the Audience nor the Audience the Theatre-can offend each other and, therefore, with full knowledge that all hypotheses are subject to Constant review and are considered valid for just so long as they "work" we will expose the core of our philosophy by stating the following:

Because of the over-confidence of a preoccupied Government - we, and you, of proven non-political views imply any Government - the abnormal behaviour of the prophetic mind of a Cabinet Minister - we both refer to any Cabinet Minister-we are made to experience the life of a couponless antarctic Eskimo minus his freedom, his furs, his igloo and his blubber. But, in order to assist a deserving Government - we mean, of course, any Government - in planning the future Utopia, where no-one will work and wages will be high, but more immediately to prevent starvation, from next week onwards, our times of performances will be as follows:- Nightly at 7-15, Thursday and Saturday at 4-15 and 7-30. Someone said somewhere, once, "cum labor omnia vincit " but, we think it was meant as a joke.

PEPPINO SANTANGELO. - From The 'Message for Margaret' programme shown Top of Page.

You may like to visit the Theatre's own Website here...

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

 

You may find the following pages from this site of interest: