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The Music Hall and Theatre History Site
Dedicated to Arthur Lloyd, 1839 - 1904.

 

David Brown's Philharmonic and Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow - And The Glasgow Music Hall and Royal Olympic Theatre, 57 Argyle Street, Glasgow

Introduction - About David Brown - Harmonic Concert rooms - Philharmonic Concert Rooms - Glasgow Music Hall / Royal Olympic Theatre - New Philharmonic - The Royal Music Hall - The Folly Theatre / Music Hall - Frame's Royal Concert Hall

Glasgow Index

A Google StreetView Image of Dunlop Street looking south from Argyle Street - Click to Interact.

Above - A Google StreetView Image of Dunlop Street looking south from Argyle Street - Click to Interact. Beyond the Buck`s Head Building on the left was David Brown's Royal Music Hall which from 1870 looked across to the Dunlop Street railway booking office and stairway up to St Enoch Station. After that station was demolished a century later, the vast area is now the St Enoch Shopping Centre.

A Postcard of Argyle Street in the heart of Glasgow, looking west, next to Dunlop Street, and showing Anderson's Royal Polytechnic store on the left - Courtesy Graeme Smith. By 1860 two of the top music-halls in Glasgow were close to each other - Shearer's Whitebait in St Enoch's Wynd just off Argyle Street and St Enoch Square, and David Brown's Philharmonic (soon to be called the Royal Music Hall, neighbouring the Theatre Royal) in Dunlop Street at Argyle Street. In 1873, the Bailie magazine called him "The Shah of the Scottish Music Halls."

Right - A Postcard of Argyle Street in the heart of Glasgow, looking west, next to Dunlop Street, and showing Anderson's Royal Polytechnic store on the left - Courtesy Graeme Smith. The left-hand corner of the property was the site of Brown's first Philharmonic Concert Hall & Supper Rooms, 4 Dunlop Street.

An 1869 town map by Bartholomew shows the position of these two concert halls and of the Theatre Royal in Dunlop Street, all east of St Enoch Square - and outlines the extent of the railway terminal being planned to reach St Enoch Square – and thanks to the National Library of Scotland the zoomable map can be seen here.

The arrival of the Glasgow & South Western Railway Company at its new city terminal impacted all three venues, with the Royal Music Hall outlasting the other two.

Vocalist and Theatre owner David Brown of the Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow, depicted in a Bailie cartoon of 1873 when he was called "The Shah of the Scottish Music Halls" - Courtesy Graeme Smith.In December 1850 David Brown opened the first of his own concert rooms, tavern and restaurant at 4, Dunlop Street – which previously had been the well-respected Manchester Tavern and dining rooms – being the first entrance on the west side of the short street just off Argyle Street, naming them the HARMONIC CONCERT ROOMS & TAVERN. In the 1860s the site became part of the 35-room Union Hotel, and in later decades part of the giant stores of Anderson's Royal Polytechnic, becoming Lewis's and today Debenham's.

Left - Vocalist and Theatre owner David Brown of the Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow, depicted in a Bailie cartoon of 1873 when he was called "The Shah of the Scottish Music Halls" - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

David Brown, born in Glasgow in 1809, was by trade a butcher (with his own shop in the Gallowgate) – later becoming a tenor, then a spirit dealer, restaurateur and Theatre owner. Brown was a tenor of significance and performed in many local concerts. For a long time he was also precentor in East Campbell Street Secession Church, Calton.

He became a professional vocalist in London in the late 1830s, including the Royal Gardens, Vauxhall, Madame Vestris' Olympic Theatre, and at the Freemasons Tavern in front of members of the royal family and the Duke of Wellington on the Anniversary of the Caledonian Royal Highland Society. And toured with an English Opera Company before returning to Glasgow. While on a tour to Greenock he went first onstage as an actor and singer at the Greenock Theatre under lessee Billy Purvis and was well rewarded. Professionally good actors among vocalists were always scarce. He never returned to church singing. Appearing on stage in operatic performances at the Theatre Royal Adelphi, Glasgow Green, may well have set him thinking about having his own venue, as might his performance soon after that in Guy Mannering at the Theatre Royal, Dunlop Street.

An Advertisement from January 1851 for the new Harmonic Room, 4 Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.In the late 1840s, David Brown sang with Sims Reeves, and with Sam Cowell (then of the Prince's Theatre Royal Glasgow and others) in towns across Scotland. In February 1849 in the City Hall, Glasgow, under the patronage of Alex Hastie MP - one of the leading slave abolitionists - Brown gave his Farewell Concert before his planned professional visit to America. David Brown often performed at Glasgow's City Hall and was frequently invited to be a soloist at numerous civic dinners.

Right - An Advertisement from January 1851 for the new Harmonic Room, 4 Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

Once established in his own venue, like James Shearer of the Whitebait, Brown also toured his own concert parties to towns such as Greenock, Paisley, Airdrie, Falkirk, Stirling and Perth.

An Advertisement from December 1852 of the Philharmonic Concert Hall & Supper Rooms, 4 Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.The Harmonic venue started jointly with Hugh Smith, a vintner in Saltmarket Street where Brown had sung in concert-parties, but that partnership soon dissolved in January 1851 making Brown sole proprietor and musical director of the business, ably assisted by his first wife Eppie. "Chair to be taken at 7pm in this elegant and unique place of Entertainments. Open every evening with a Select Vocal Corps."

By December 1852, and with additional accommodation now in play, the Harmonic name changed to the PHILHARMONIC CONCERT HALL & SUPPER ROOMS.

Left - An Advertisement from December 1852 of the Philharmonic Concert Hall & Supper Rooms, 4 Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

He offered "First Class Drawing Room Intellectual Entertainment" starting with chamber concerts, glees and madrigals, providing vocalists, instrumentalists, later adding dancers, and comique singers. But this also was soon too small for his growing business, and five years on he moved eastwards across Dunlop Street, by taking up the hall in Wilson's Court, entered from 57 Argyle Street, which had been the Glasgow Music Hall, then changed to be the Royal Olympic Theatre, details below.

The Glasgow Music Hall, Argyle Street, Glasgow

Later - The Royal Olympic Theatre / The Argyll Rooms

An early 19th century painting of Argyle Street Glasgow showing opening to Dunlop Street beside the Bucks Head Hotel, former mansion of Provost Murdoch and, to left, the former mansion of Provost Dunlop; with the entry between the two leading to Wilson`s Court – sites of David Brown's Philharmonic and Royal Music Hall businesses - Courtesy Graeme Smith.From the 18th century two of the early and splendid merchant townhouses of Glasgow sat close to newly opened Dunlop Street, and now had commercial businesses within them. One had been the mansion of Provost John Murdoch and was now the Buck's Head Hotel at the corner of Dunlop Street, and its eastern neighbour had been the mansion of Provost Colin Dunlop - and later the Wilson family - and now contained "handsome" shops.

Right - An early 19th century painting of Argyle Street Glasgow showing opening to Dunlop Street beside the Bucks Head Hotel, former mansion of Provost Murdoch and, to left, the former mansion of Provost Dunlop; with the entry between the two leading to Wilson`s Court – sites of David Brown's Philharmonic and Royal Music Hall businesses - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

An Advertisement from July 1851 for the Glasgow Music Hall, 57 Argyll Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.On three sides of a square built on the rear grounds of the Dunlop mansion, and known as Wilson's Court, a hall and fashionable shops were built, entered through the pend at 57, Argyle Street between the two mansions. The hall was leased for many years to a partnership of medical doctors and was known as the (Western) Apothecaries' Hall. Once that lease ended a new music hall emerged, complete with gallery, the Glasgow Music Hall. It was 53 feet long, accommodating about 300 people. The stage was 23 feet long, and its American bowling alley 60 feet long . There was also a Curling Saloon with a curling table made of metal for the admirers of the "roaring game."

Left - An Advertisement from July 1851 for the Glasgow Music Hall, 57 Argyll Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

Opening in 1851, the Glasgow Music Hall was run by Alex MacLaren, firstly on temperance lines and was well attended. His bill of fare included soloists, minstrels and instrumentalists from around Britain but a later drinks licence was not renewed in 1852 and the hall was given up that year.

Successive lessees included John Springthorpe who added his well-regarded wax works of 120 celebrities of all nations (which he toured round Britain and Ireland), while his band and singers gave promenade concerts. Some years later he and his wife settled in Dundee, where, tragically, in New Year 1865, twenty-five people died in the rush of hundreds in icy conditions down the stairway to his Bell Street Concert Rooms which seated 700.

For a period from August 1853 the Glasgow Music Hall was operated by Edwin McCann, late musical director of the Theatre Royal and Prince's Theatre Royal. "Admissions to Gallery 6d , Body of Hall 4d , to be Returned in Refreshments of the Best quality." In later years he and his wife featured as artistes in concerts at the Trades Hall and other places. In 1855 the Glasgow Music Hall changed its name to Olympic.

In April 1855 the Glasgow Herald expressed its:- "commendation of the handsome petite Olympic Theatre, which has been opened in Argyll Street, under the management of Mr. Cockrill, who was for many seasons a favourite (comedy) actor in the Prince's Theatre. He has got together an able company of actors, who have been performing a round of popular dramas with much taste. The act-drop - a view of the Clyde, from opposite Dumbarton, with stranded ships in the foreground, and the snow-capped head of the giant Ben in the distance - beautifully painted by Mr. Sam Bough - is itself a treat well worth going to see."

Cockrill's wife-to-be was Helen MacBeth who had sung in performances with David Brown at the Theatre Royal Adelphi on Glasgow Green. The Royal Olympic Theatre ran until early 1856 and is said to have been too small to pay. A programme of the Royal Olympic under Cockrill can be seen here.

The building changed name, this time to the Argyll Rooms. In April 1856 a gentleman enquired of its use for one night, to hold a soiree and ball the following week. Money was paid, but the outgoing lessee discovered that a Bal Masque was arranged involving houses of ill repute. The outgoing tenant was alarmed by this and locked the premises but was told to open for males, and police lined the front refusing entry to females. The Scottish Guardian reported:- "A scene ensued as we have never before witnessed in Glasgow. Cab after cab arrived, filled with women, dressed in every variety of costume, rich and rare, and tried to gain entry. When they were told the state of the case, they launched out in volleys of most profane oaths, and made use of most disgusting and obscene language. A number of gentlemen having paid the stipulated sum of 5/-, were permitted to enter the hall, and the music having struck up, they commenced waltzing and polkaing in pairs."

The man involved, Absalom Shackleton, took a longer lease and opened it for business as the Salle de Danse & Refreshment Rooms, where waitresses were also danseuses. Its advertisement stated "The Ball Room is lofty and spacious, with a commodious Dressing Room. A Full Quadrille Band. Admission One Shilling." Shackleton, as lessee, was fined on one occasion for harbouring prostitutes. After this, he became a wholesale jeweller until he was bankrupted.

The New Philharmonic Concert Hall & Supper Rooms, Argyle Street, Glasgow

Formerly - The Glasgow Music Hall / Royal Olympic Theatre

In the summer of 1857 David Brown, still reaping success at 4, Dunlop Street, took it up as the (new) Philharmonic Concert Hall & Supper Rooms. For a time, his manager was no less than David Prince Miller, who in the 1840s had opened the mighty Theatre Royal Adelphi. "Open every day for General Business at 10 am. Concert every Evening at 7pm. Ladies to be admitted to the Balcony, only if accompanied by a Gentleman, Every evening but Saturday." It continued with the bowling alley.

Over the years Brown found that, despite his classical programme, his customers more and more preferred vaudeville which attracted substantially larger audiences. Always well regarded in the city, he presented a Philharmonic Cup in 1860 to the newly formed Clyde Swimming Club, for its annual major race over 900 yards. He became and remained a wealthy man, but his premises again became too small.

The Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow

Often refered to as Brown's Royal Music Hall

Dunlop Street, Glasgow photographed around 1864 shows the city's Theatre Royal and on the left of the photograph is David Brown's new Royal Music Hall with its prominent ventilated roof - From a photograph by Thomas Annan 1863 - Mitchell Library, Glasgow.

Above - Dunlop Street, Glasgow photographed around 1864 shows the city's Theatre Royal and on the left of the photograph is David Brown's new Royal Music Hall with its prominent ventilated roof - From a photograph by Thomas Annan 1863 - Mitchell Library, Glasgow.

The Bucks Head Hotel was being demolished and a new building – today's Buck's Head Building - designed by architect Alexander "Greek " Thomson - started construction in 1863. To the south of its line, on the east side of Dunlop Street, David Brown decided to have his own new property. This would become his latest Philharmonic. The Dean of Guild granted consent to him in September 1863 for a new three-storey building, consisting of a concert hall and shops. His funding was assisted by loans from two distillers, Usher of Edinburgh and MacDonald of Glasgow. A drinks licence was granted in 1864 on condition no billiards was played, nor (card) games room permitted, all under the watchful eye of his general manager, George Wallace.

An Advertisement from May 1870 for Brown`s Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.In May 1864 his new restaurant, tavern and hall opened under a new title, the Royal Music Hall, because of its proximity to the Theatre Royal. He employed about 20 people, excluding the artistes. His adverts proudly stated : "Where any Gentleman can with impunity bring his Family. Doors open at half-past Six. Overture at Seven."

Right - An Advertisement from May 1870 for Brown`s Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

In addition to duetists, instrumentalists and others he staged the Vokes Family – a burlesque-ballet company – to great acclaim and financial reward. His Dining Rooms also opened with dinners from 12 noon to 6pm and suppers from 8 o'clock to Half-past 10 every evening. Soon he was adding breakfasts from 8am.

The Glasgow Herald, reporting on the dinner held to mark the opening, writes in 1864:- "The new Hall has been chastely designed and admirably executed, and combines the pleasing appearance of a miniature Theatre with the snug-comfort of an ordinary sitting room. The seats are numerous and roomy, and the platform large and commodious, while the decorations (carried out under the superintendence of Mr David Haire, of Messrs. Hugh Bogle & Co.) are rich, without being unnecessarily gaudy."

Other editions said more:- "This new concert hall was recently opened by Mr. David Brown in Dunlop Street. The artistes who appear are undoubtedly of considerable talent; but it is not our purpose now to point out the vocal and other dainties with which the audiences are served, so much as to notice briefly the character of the hall itself. Externally, the elevation is symmetrical and proportional. The interior consists of an auditorium, with front and side galleries so arranged that the audience from all parts may obtain a full view of the stage. The latest improvements in ventilation and acoustics have been taken advantage of; the lighting is admirable, being brilliant and uniform, and the decorations artistic, harmonious, and chaste. The various apartments devoted to refreshment purposes, as well as the retiring and waiting rooms, are furnished in the most tasteful manner, while the green-room, library, and dressing-rooms are commodious and comfortably fitted up. The hall is altogether one of much beauty, and the company which Mr Brown has brought together is of a much higher class than we have hitherto been accustomed to in such places of entertainment."

The new music hall was also advertised for let "for Public Worship on Sabbaths, capable of holding from 1,000 to 1,200 persons, comfortably seated, and in every way adapted for large congregations."

In late 1865 he applied for a Theatre licence to stage drama but withdrew it because the magistrates were trying to cut down the number of Theatres. He applied again in 1867, knowing the Theatre Royal would soon be demolished by the railway company but was told he would have to give up his liquor licence.

During July 1866 he staged selections from Balfe's opera "The Bohemian Girl." On hearing of this success Michael Balfe sued for infringement of copyright. At the Sheriff Court, Brown agreed he had these performed but contended that infringement could only apply if it was "in a place of dramatic entertainment." He had no such licence and was a music hall. However, Balfe was awarded damages, in a court case which clarified the then law, the Sheriff stating that "as the selections were in the defender's hall, with all the adjuncts of stage, orchestra, footlights and a set scene, they ipso facto converted that hall for the time being, if it was not so before, into a place of dramatic entertainment." Jessye Norman's singing of I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls conveys the quality of production with which David Brown was associated in his era and can be enjoyed here.

An Advertisement from November 1872 for the Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow featuring Arthur Lloyd - Courtesy Graeme Smith.Vaudeville proved the greatest attraction for his patrons, and most lucrative. Arthur Lloyd's brother Robert Lloyd performed at the Royal Music Hall along with his wife Lizzie Nelson, as did Jim Moss, the fiddler comedian, father of Edward Moss who went on to found Moss Empires.

Left - An Advertisement from November 1872 for the Royal Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow featuring Arthur Lloyd's brother Robert Lloyd and his wife Lizzie Nelson - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

In his Memoir of 1907 Willie Frame writes:- "He was a great favourite in "Davie Broon's", Dunlop Street, Glasgow, and on one occasion fulfilled an engagement which ran for thirteen consecutive weeks. He perhaps was not a Paganini or a Paderewski, but he was equally at home with the violin and piano." His son, the future Sir Edward Moss, also played piano.

The entrances to Brown's Dunlop Street property were:- No. 19 David Brown, wine & spirit merchant's Spirit Shop. No. 21 Royal Music Hall, and box office open from 10 to 2 daily. No. 23 Brown's Royal Restaurant, also now containing a room with two billiards tables. And he still leased a gangway through from 57 Argyle Street, formerly Wilson's Court, to the rear of his new building.

A Travel poster for the Glasgow & South Western Railway company; in addition to its main line service to and from London St Pancras, and network across the South West of Scotland, it promoted extensive services to the resorts of the Firth of Clyde - Courtesy Graeme Smith.In December 1870 Dunlop Street Station opened - it had first been suggested in 1847, when the major Union Arcade proposal ceased and the need emerged for a city terminal on the north-bank of the Clyde - with his premises facing directly over to the Glasgow & South Western Railway company's booking office at 20 Dunlop Street, and station entrance stairway. Ideal for business, morning, noon and night. He soon had to enlarge his Royal Restaurant and Vaults. (In October 1876 Dunlop Street Station transformed into St Enoch Station, the Hotel opening in 1879.) In addition to cellarage and kitchens his total property now included on the ground floor – a spirit shop, restaurant bar, ladies lounge (replete with decanters and crystal glasses), dining room, and smoking-room bar; and upstairs – the music hall and its bar, and an American bar complete with billiards. The proscenium stage had 9 drop scenes available and four pairs of wings. The orchestra could house eight players and had a rosewood harmonium, 12-stop Alexandre, and a rosewood grand piano by Broadwood.

Right - A Travel poster for the Glasgow & South Western Railway company; in addition to its main line service to and from London St Pancras, and network across the South West of Scotland, it promoted extensive services to the resorts of the Firth of Clyde - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

In 1876 David Brown abolished ballet girls from his programme. When his liquor licence was being renewed that year he was asked by Bailie Collins (publisher and printer, and temperance advocate) "I understand that the price of admission to the body of the hall includes a supply of coffee, cigars, beer, wine, and spirits." Mr Brown replied "Any person getting a shilling ticket is entitled to a cigar, a cup of coffee, a glass of whisky, a glass of rum, or a glass of sherry; but not a glass of champagne. That would be too much, and we do not keep it on draught."

Bailie Scott asked if it "would not be better to have tickets with no drink allowance attached to them." Mr Brown replied that he did not think such an arrangement would work well.

In succession to George Wallace, Harry Harcourt was the hall's manager and chairman from around 1877, when David Brown's health declined, until 1881.

Brown died at the end of 1880 and his widow the following year. His trustees promptly sought offers from others to continue the business under a 7-year lease. In July 1881 they considered three offers, from (1) James Patterson, Glasgow – who may have been the owner of the music warehouse in Buchanan Street (2) Thomas Rodgers, Alexandra Music Hall, Hanley and (3) Arthur Lloyd, London. They selected Thomas Rodgers who claimed 25 years business experience. He promptly started but by May 1882 he was sequestrated. The trustees this time advertised in the press and two new offers were considered with Alex McGregor of Edinburgh selected. (In the autumn of 1881 Arthur Lloyd went on to lease the Shakespeare Music Hall in Watson Street, Gallowgate.)

A Photograph of the newly formed Glasgow Police Band in 1882 - Courtesy Alistair Dinsmor and the Glasgow Police Museum.David Brown was born with music, and went out with music. In his Will, after providing for his wife, he left sizable donations to hospitals and like-minded charities and a similar amount ( £200 ) to the City of Glasgow Police Board "which shall be applied by them in the formation of an Instrumental Band for the Glasgow Police force."

Left - A Photograph of the newly formed Glasgow Police Band in 1882 - Courtesy Alistair Dinsmor and the Glasgow Police Museum.

However, in a later codicil he had cancelled that instruction, presumably because he learned that Glasgow Corporation, at last, decided to have a police band – first mooted in 1877 - and to buy instruments itself. The band's first public appearance was at an afternoon concert in the City Hall on Saturday 25 February 1882.

Glasgow Police Band, starting as a military band and becoming a pipe band, has played in public parks, Theatres and concert halls over the years, and changed its name now and again, including to Strathclyde Police Band when it became regular World Champions. The band can be seen and enjoyed, in full dress uniform and Royal Stewart tartan, at a festival in Germany, here in 2004, some 122 years after its formation with encouragement from David Brown.

The Folly Theatre / Music Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow

An Advertisement from September 1882 for the Folly Theatre of Varieties, Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.The Royal Music Hall and supper rooms were advertised for lease by the Brown trustees in May, 1882, attracting Alexander McGregor from Edinburgh who took over and changed its name to the Folly Theatre of Varieties - becoming known as the Folly Music Hall - and promoted his Folly Restaurant and Vaults, with their American and Oyster Bars.

Right - An Advertisement from September 1882 for the Folly Theatre of Varieties, Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

A Song-sheet from the early 1880s and a young Vesta Tilley - Courtesy Graeme Smith.The Evening Citizen reported on its opening in September 1882:- "What used to be known as Brown's Music Hall was last night, after having been closed for some time, reopened under the name of the Folly Theatre - Mr. A. McGregor proprietor. The building has been newly painted and redecorated in a very tasteful style by Messrs. George Dobie & Son of Edinburgh. Large sized classic figures and portraits of celebrities in poetry and music adorn the walls, and lend a pleasing variety to the general style. Much care and considerable artistic skill have been given by the scenic department, the drop scene being a fine representation of lnverlochy Castle. An interesting programme was produced to inaugurate the season last night, and the house was crammed."

Left - A Song-sheet from the early 1880s and a young Vesta Tilley - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

Its range of variety artistes included a young Vesta Tilley and Harry Linn, as thin as a lamppost, one of who's many comic songs, was about Jock McGraw, The Stoutest Man in the Forty Twa, was sung all over the country and has been kindly transcribed by Adam McNaughtan here.

The first general manager was Robert McKean, who was moving round a number of music halls in the Glasgow area, including the Royal Alexandra and the Britannia. The Folly prices were pit 6d, circle 1/-, boxes 1/6d, - claiming in trade papers to be the only music hall in Scotland which charged theatrical prices. In 1884 McGregor appointed Charles Merion of London's Trocadero to manage the Folly. McGregor followed Brown's example and presented a Challenge Cup to the West of Scotland Swimming Club for 100 yards' competition.

Frame's Royal Concert Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow

W. F. Frame - Courtesy Ross Collins and collinsvariety.co.uk.In February 1886 the music hall, excluding the restaurant and vaults, came under the control of Willie Frame who renamed it as Frame's Royal Concert Hall, with a full programme of concert and variety. He ran it on teetotal principles. In March that year he opened the large saloon attached to the hall for smoking concerts which were held every night from 10 to 12 pm. Admittance was free, with tickets to be had at the pay office. "The artistes will be the same as at the Concert Hall. Refreshments will be served at moderate prices." In summer months, with the hall continuing, he took his W. F. Frame Royal Concert Party on tour round towns in Scotland.

Right - W. F. Frame - Courtesy Ross Collins and collinsvariety.co.uk.

An Advertisement from May 1886 for Frame's Royal Concert Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.The musical director was Thomas Walker and general manager James Booth, who became an accompanist for Frame's vaudeville touring party. Entry was Pit and Promenade 6d, Balcony 1/-, Centre Boxes 1/6d, and Private Boxes 2/- each person.

Left - An Advertisement from May 1886 for Frame's Royal Concert Hall, Dunlop Street, Glasgow - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

The hall was active until July 1887. The whole property was redeveloped and became the Glasgow & South Western Railway company's parcels office.

A Photograph of St Enoch Station and Hotel overlooking the Square, with North Drive, on left, providing access to offices and reaching Dunlop Street, facing Brown's Royal Music Hall - Courtesy Graeme Smith.The Google view of Dunlop Street today, shown at the top of this page, can be compared with a 1960s photograph from Argyle Street looking down Dunlop Street with the (obscured) former music hall at the far end of the Bucks Head Building and the immense railway structures crossing over the street into St. Enoch Station and its lofty glazed arches here.

Right - A Photograph of St Enoch Station and Hotel overlooking the Square, with North Drive, on left, providing access to offices and reaching Dunlop Street, facing Brown's Royal Music Hall - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

Brown's former Philharmonic Concert Hall & Supper Rooms in Wilson's Court became one of the (now) 32 dining rooms / halls of the Great Western Cooking Depot and Dining Rooms founded by philanthropist Thomas Corbett and continued to be run by his manager Thomas Jenkins who also started his own Waterloo Rooms, forerunner of the Alhambra Theatre in Wellington Street.

All the articles on this page were kindly written for this site by Graeme Smith in July 2018.

If you have any more information or images for any of these venues please Contact me.

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