Arthur Lloyd.co.uk
The Music Hall and Theatre History Site
Dedicated to Arthur Lloyd, 1839 - 1904.

 

The Music Pavilion, Pittencreiff Park & Glen, Dunfermline

Later - The Glen Pavilion

Dunfermline Index

A photograph of the Dunfermline Music Pavilion Concert Hall in Pittencreiff Park - Courtesy Graeme Smith

Above - A photograph of the Dunfermline Music Pavilion Concert Hall in Pittencreiff Park - Courtesy Graeme Smith

The opening of the Dunfermline Music Pavilion Concert Hall in June 1935 - Left to Right Sir John Gilmour, Sir James Norval, and architect John Fraser - Courtesy Graeme Smith.One of many endowments in education, welfare and arts made possible by Andrew Carnegie in honour of his home town was opened in June 1935 in Pittencreiff Park.

Music had started in the park from 1904 and the Carnegie Trustees were spending £3,000 per annum on open-air music. They now wanted indoor facilities to combat the elements. This was the Music Pavilion seating 500, with stage facilities for indoor entertainment by visiting bands, singers and concert parties, and complete with a restaurant. On its north side the outdoor stage and terraced arena already in place continued.

Right - The opening of the Dunfermline Music Pavilion Concert Hall in June 1935 - Left to Right Sir John Gilmour, Sir James Norval, and architect John Fraser - Courtesy Graeme Smith.

The Music Pavilion was designed by John Fraser, architect of the Alhambra, an architect much used by the Trust. When Andrew Carnegie started his Dunfermline Trust in 1903, and added to it his purchase - and gift to the town - of the parklands of Pittencreiff one of the very first possibilities discussed by the new trustees then was the provision of a major theatre or concert hall for the enjoyment of plays and music.

When the Great War finished such a project came back to the table with a site considered in the new Park. However most trustees continued to say it would be too far from the town centre and potentially very costly to build because of the sloping site. However by the 1930s a slim majority voted for the theatre project, designed by veteran architect Sir George Washington Browne, and which would accommodate 1,400 people. In the event it was not built, partly because of the Depression and uncertainties over a final cost. The total cost of the Music Pavilion and of the Carnegie Hall opening a few years later was about half of the projected cost of the aborted Concert Hall & Theatre in the Park.

At the opening of the Music Pavilion in 1935 by Sir John Gilmour MP, and former Home Secretary, a gold key was presented by the architect to duly open the door. In the foyer Gilmour also unveiled the Goulden Fountain, the work of the late sculptor Richard Goulden – Art Adviser to the Trust – who designed Carnegie`s statue in the park.

Today the building continues to be a public venue, known as the Glen Pavilion, and is undergoing a major extension.

The above information on the Music Pavilion was written for this site by Graeme Smith in April 2013.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.

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