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The Battersea Palace, 32 York Road, Battersea, London

Formerly - The Washington Music Hall / Standard (Washington) Music Hall / Battersea Palace of Varieties / New Battersea Empire / Battersea Empire / Palace Theatre of Varieties / The Super Palace

Also see in this area - Clapham's Theatres and Cinemas - The Riverside Theatre and Festival Gardens, Battersea Park - The Albert Palace and Open Air Theatre, Battersea

The Auditorium of the Battersea Palace Music Hall - From A Battersea Palace Programme - Courtesy Peter Charlton.

Above - The Auditorium of the Battersea Palace Music Hall - From A Battersea Palace Programme - Courtesy Peter Charlton.

 

A Battersea Palace Music Hall Programme whilst under the ownership of The Macnaghten Vaudeville Circuit - Courtesy Peter Charlton.The Battersea Palace originally opened as the Washington Music Hall in 1886 and was built for George Washington Moore who managed the Theatre for the next 8 years.

Arthur Lloyd is known to have performed at the Washington Music Hall, Battersea in 1890 and 1892.

The Theatre was originally planned to be called the Royal Standard Music Hall before it opened but this name was never used, possibly because it could have been confused with the Royal Standard Music Hall in Victoria. The Theatre was however sometimes known as the Standard (Washington) Music Hall on various occasions until 1900.

The Theatre had a seating capacity of 600.

Right - A Battersea Palace Music Hall Programme whilst under the ownership of The Macnaghten Vaudeville Circuit - Courtesy Peter Charlton.

In 1900 the Theatre was renamed the Battersea Palace of Varieties but the following year the name reverted back to the Washington Music Hall.

In 1902 it was renamed the New Battersea Empire but by 1903 it was known as the more simple Battersea Empire. This name remained until 1908 when the Theatre was renamed the Palace Theatre of Varieties.

In 1917 the Theatre was renamed again, this time to the Battersea Palace, a name it retained until it was renamed The Super Palace in the 1920s when it began operating as a Cine Variety Theatre.

After the War the Theatre was taken over by Bloom Theatres Ltd but this was not to last long and it was closed in 1958. The Theatre then remained dark and derelict until it was finally demolished in the late 1960s and the site was used for new housing.

If you have any more information or images for this Theatre that you are willing to share please Contact me.